New video series highlights benefits of Rooted in Relationships

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Nebraska Children and Families Foundation initiative Rooted in Relationships has released a series of videos to help explain the rationale behind the initiative, the models and best practices it uses, and how communities across the state are seeing success since implementing Rooted in Relationships and its evidence-based models.

Rooted in Relationships is an initiative that aims to make the most of children’s earliest years to develop strong social-emotional skills by forming stronger, healthier bonds between young children and their caregivers. By building these connections and social-emotional skills so early in life, the initiative shows that children are better equipped to manage their emotions later on, which can help avoid the need for interventions and systems involvement.

According to home-based childcare provider Cindy Hoyer, ”After doing this for 20-some years, what were they going to tell me that’s different? There are a lot of things you can still learn. Since I’ve started the Pyramid Model, I’ve noticed a huge change in how my daycare is run. Things go so much smoother; the kids get along better; I feel better. I really like it.”

Why Rooted in Relationships?

The first video in the series offers a general overview of the initiative – how it works, its goals, and its positive effects on both children and caregivers.

Rooted in Relationships has found that by building these connections and social-emotional skills so early in life, children are better equipped to manage their emotions later on, which can help avoid the need for systems involvement and interventions.

How does it work?

Last fall, we highlighted Rooted in Relationship’s primary tenet: the Pyramid Model for Supporting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children. That’s still quite the mouthful, and it’s a big concept to dig into – so the Rooted in Relationships team created several videos to better explain the Pyramid Model, its implementation, and why it really works.

Essentially, the overarching goal of the Pyramid Model is to create a positive experience for each child using evidence-based practices that promote child engagement and learning while focusing on teaching children how to develop friendships and regulate their emotions.

The Pyramid Model provides strategies for encouraging healthy social-emotional development and a strong foundation for all children, with increasing levels of support for children who need additional interventions. Once it’s implemented, the results are nothing short of inspiring – and moving.

By establishing and reinforcing emotional supports for young children, they feel safer, more nurtured, and better able to ask for what they need and interact with others in appropriate and healthy ways. After all, as one little boy proved, it’s much easier to have someone else’s back when you know someone’s got yours!

Rooted in Relationships across Nebraska

Rooted in Relationships and the Pyramid Model are already at work in several communities in Nebraska, including Dawson County, Saline County, and Dakota County, each of which spent some time in front of the camera for Rooted in Relationships’ video series. Get to know the communities below:

Rooted in Relationships hopes to continue growing and implementing the initiative in more and more communities across the state, so that all of Nebraska’s children are able to develop the social skills and emotional strength they need to grow into successful young adults.

Nebraska Children and Families Foundation supports children, young adults and families at risk with the overall goal of giving our state's most vulnerable kids what they need to reach their full potential. We do this by building strong communities that support families so their children can grow up to be thriving, productive adults.

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Posted in Early Childhood

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