Circle of Security for healthy social emotional development

Each of the programs we fund and support is unique based on the needs and strengths of the community it serves. One of the methods some of our programs are using to foster health social emotional development is Circle of Security Parenting.

According to the website, Circle of Security is a relationship based early intervention program designed to give children a feeling of security that empowers them to go out into the world and explore, learn, grow and build relationships.

Decades of university-based research support the idea that “secure” children are more empathetic have stronger self-esteem,  and build better relationships with both parents and other children. They’re also better prepared to start school and have a greater capacity to handle emotional challenges in a healthy way.

Why it matters.

Things like empathy and emotional capacity are often lumped into a “soft skills” category. This misnomer gives the impression that these living skills are somehow less important or applicable than more technical, tactical skills like math and reading.

But employers and educators agree this is simply not the case.

The ability to handle emotional challenges and to persist in the face of obstacles are the primary attributes that determine whether a child will make a successful transition to adulthood. Children who don’t learn these skills are at risk of:

  • Educational failure
  • Chronic unemployment
  • Low-quality relationships
  • Insufficient motivation to succeed

In short, soft skills matter. Hard skills give kids what they need to know, but soft skills give them the backbone and social navigational skills to get things done.

Circle of Security proposes one way to help encourage this. What are your thoughts about the theory?

 

 

Nebraska Children and Families Foundation supports children, young adults and families at risk with the overall goal of giving our state's most vulnerable kids what they need to reach their full potential. We do this by building strong communities that support families so their children can grow up to be thriving, productive adults.

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Posted in Early Childhood

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